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question. germany's environment minister believe so, but he says the country has to completely rethink the way it subsidizes renewals. >> with elections due next year, the rising cost of electricity has become an issue. environment minister is calling for a government overhaul of renewable energy. he says current policy favors quantity, not quality. >> we need the appropriate instruments to ensure that the expansion of renewable energy takes place in a steady and predictable fashion, and we want to make renewals competitive on the energy market as soon as possible -- we want to make renewables competitive on the energy market as soon as possible. >> he is also calling on a time line on phasing out government subsidies, and he wants to regulate the pace of the grid, but in germany's greens say the cost of switching to renewable resources are being unfairly distributed. >> stay with us. when we come back, the international community marking the very first girls' state. we will see how schoolgirls in pakistan are showing their support for the 14-year-old activist shot by the taliban. -- m
of identifying risky practices that might contaminate the environment or expose workers to high risk, health and safety issues? whistleblowing protection is critical, especially for facilities like the los alamos national laboratory, because of the nature of the work that is done and the kind of materials they work with. >> will take a break and come back. we will be joined also by a guest from the navajo dine nation, to talk about the uranium mines and what happens when they are closed. our guests are chuck montaÑo, former inspector here at the lab who became a whistleblower, and jay coghlan, executive director of nuclear watched mexico. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!,", the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from los alamos, new mexico. this state is home to the navajo nation. for decades, they fought uranium mining on their land despite a mining moratorium on the troubled property, the company hydro resources ink is seeking approval to mine near the towns of crownpoint and church rock. uranium has been mined here for mo
environment for that talent. >> energy and then campaign finance. >> you are looking at california right now. their massive increases in the costs. when consumers are paying for gasoline, they're not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. what is happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulation that impact energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the costs of energy. we need to have the same focus of discussion in washington. what is happening in california can happen -- >> it is harder to buy gas in california and hawaii, from what i heard. -- than hawaii, from what i heard. >> if you have a stool with two legs, it will fall over. look at what the canadians did with their cash cow. we have more of a cash cow in energy than anyone. we can do spending, taxes, and energy with our cash cow. we can make a real deal. >> tom, you think this will happen with the makeup of the government we have today? >> i think when people figure out there is a big chunk of change and there is a debate of people trying to protect entitlements and those tryi
that they foster or can deal in a diverse environment. that's understood the plan, that it's not just giving you a plus because of race. it is combining that with other factors. >> there is a plus because of race. many factors in the decision. might i say that the white student president of the class in a different school is a measure of leadership. leadership is an independent factor in the pai. he's not getting a point because of his race. he's getting that because of his leadership. but his recent tour criteria to argue for anyone. it is an independent add-on, something they can use to boost a pai score or element in any way they like as they contextualize it. is that it's not necessarily, not narrowly tailored. it ignores alternatives and gives disparate treatment to asian-americans because they are minorities as well enter the extent it depends on the classroom factor, there's simply no way to relate or fit what they are doing to the solution of the problem, which they use as a major foundation of their proposal, which is the nonfirst first classroom. certainly dishes no correspondence ther
. upon it said the pipeline would have devastated the environment and residents a risk of deadly explosions freed last year, activists and biology professor appeared on democracy now to talk about the project. >> the concern from the community point of view is the ecological damage and the risk the pipeline will pose to over 200,000 people, and is also about the economy, reducing cost of energy we [indiscernible] all of the infrastructure of potential benefits. there is no benefit for the people of puerto rico. economically speaking. >> an east texas, activists protesting the construction of the keystone xl will pipeline are continuing their attempts to block tree clearing efforts for a third week amidst reported crackdowns on journalists. two reporters embedded with the activists were arrested and held overnight before charges against them were dropped. activists say transcanada, the company behind oil pipeline, is paying local police to provide security. two journalists from the new york times were held in handcuffs before being released. activists with the tar sands blockade s
house call" coming up. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> groovy music and great topics is what we have today on "sunday house call." joining us, dr. david smatty, chief of robotics at the mount sinai medical center. >> and dr. marc siegel. he's also the author of the book, the inner pulse, unlocking the secret code of sickness and health. good morning. >> good morning. >> we start with the serious topic, that meningitis outbreak. the cdc reports seven people have died and more than 60 people have been infected across nine states from what it believed to be contaminated steroid injections. what do we need to know about this? if you got a steroid infection, how do you know if you have this and what do you do? >> it's not just body builders. >> no, it's a serious and fatal disease. this made the media and news, men meningitis is
resident security officer eric nordstrom, these incidents paint a clear picture that the environment in libya was fragile at best and could degrade quickly. tonight four republican senators led by john mccain are demanding answers from the cia director and other top intelligence officials in what is becoming an explosive campaign issue. the state department denies it rejected requests for more security, but says house republicans cut $300 million from their security budget. tonight four weeks after the attack, the department gave its first blow by blow account of what was clearly a well organized assault, never a spontaneous demonstration as officials first claimed. brian? >> hearings tomorrow. andrea mitchell with our story. thanks. >>> from pakistan tonight a truly shocking story of brutality against a 14-year-old girl targeted for assassination by the taliban because she dared to stand up and speak out. the world is just now learning about this. and reacting to it in horror. we get our report tonight from our nbc news pakistan based correspondent amna nawaz. >> reporter: she's kno
important way to create an environment of changes around creating community support for education. leadershipen's program where we have worked with 400 people to inform them about the importance of women having access to numerous seats, literacy, and forming part of the community in terms of investing in jobs and learning. >> keep up the good work in afghanistan. you're watching bbc world news america. the chinese also picked up the nobel prize, we will tell you what is between the pages that one such high praise. the human rights group amnesty international says millions of people in china are affected by forced evictions from their land. the debt ridden local authorities are increasingly seizing and selling off land. martin has more on this story from beijing. >> we are in a neighborhood of beijing slated for demolition. this used to be somebody's,, horrible strewn across the place. if you look to my right, you can see just beyond another empty home. what is surprising is that many people have chosen to stay. i have seen an old man in the garden tending his vegetables and anothe
of the people of this country. we will also not hear about the global impact of global warming, the environment. we will not hear about climate. we will not hear about global inequality. there is a whole range of issues that will simply not make it on to that debate agenda and the military budget is probably right at the top of the list. tavis: we shall see. two more debates to go. we thank you for your time. >> always a pleasure. tavis: that is our show tonight. you can download our app. thank you for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley on tavis: join me next time with ethan hawke on his new movie. >> there is a saying that dr. king had he said there's always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we're only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have a lot of work to do. wal-mart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you
. our energy price environment, because we have had th amazing gas revolution is a much more favorable environment. we have had high productivity growth over a long period of time. so actually there is some now re-shoring going on. companies like ge are actually out there bringing back at the margin jobs they had shifted abroad to come here. that is the first -- >> you mentioned ge -- well -- the tweet got him into all sorts of trouble, challenging these unbelievable job numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. >> that is jack welch. i think what laura is saying is so so important that we have an opportunity in the business community regardless of what happens in the election had. and actually, what we're talking about, republicans and democrats coming together to say it is not about politics. it is about we have a fiscal cliff coming. we have 25% unemployment among the young. this is not republican or democratic, this is not capitalists or occupy wall street. this is a problem for all of us. and what we do with the henry jackson initiative is we showcase companies like ibm, like
you reconcile that with your voting record? >> i have a very strong record on the environment in the united states senate. [laughter] i have a record where i voted for the superfund legislation. i have a record where i voted against my president on the override of the clean water act. i have voted for the major pieces of environmental legislation that have come down and been voted on in the united states senate. this administration and i support this administration and its environmental efforts has moved in the area for the first time to deal with the ozone problem. we now have an international treaty, the treaty that is commonly referred to as the montreal treaty. for the first time we are talking about the impact of co2 to the ozone layer. that's progress with the environment. we are committed to the environment. i take my children hiking and fishing, walking in the woods, in the wilderness. believe me, we have a commit to preserving the environment. you bring up the environment, you can't help but think about the environmental policy of the governor of massachusetts. he tal
need. what we need is for the federal government to establish and create an environment where the private sector can flourish. >> talking about earmarks is exactly the kind of craziness we do not need any more. earmarked -- $16 trillion debt. earmarked account for 1/2 of 1% of the federal budget. we are better off, but talking about that is like talking about a drop of water in the ocean. the government does not create jobs. the private sector creates jobs. if you one example, take a look at texas. the people in texas are close to the people in arizona. why and there -- is their economy doing so fantastic? they are consistently ranked as one of the top state friendly to business. what does that mean? they mean lower taxes, low regulation. and not worry about government trading infrastructure. all the government has to do is get out of the way and let the free market to its thing. >> you have been criticized for not bringing home the bacon, not doing enough to get federal money into arizona. how do you respond? >> most of the earmarks, in the transportation bill. that had 6300
bank and under the current regulatory environment, as bank took a look at his business plan and said here is your problem -- you are asset rich and cash poor. he said i know that, if i had the cash it would not be here for a loan. he would have to over collateralize a loan by 150% under the current regulatory environment. i want him to be able to grow his business. it's a classic example of regulation killing jobs. we need to make sure we have the proper amount of legislation but not overregulation. my commercials talk about reducing spending, and powering our work force for training for jobs available and developing a comprehensive energy policy to put our people back to work, energy independence to protect our environment. >> 30 seconds to rebut. >> you have been running some of the most deceitful attack at the state has ever seen. don't try to pretend that has not been what's happening in that race. when your campaign was asked why you don't start talking about the issues, your campaign manager said it would be a senseless exercise. that's right. for linda mcmahon talking at the i
're the best environment for the talent spent before we go to questions, jay, then i want to talk about campaign financing. >> so you're looking at california right now, and that massive increase in the cost of gasoline, when matt said, when consumers are paying for gasoline they are not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. so what's happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulations that impact the energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the cost of energy. we've got to have that same focus and discussion here in washington. because what's happening in california can happen all across this country. >> hawaii, i heard -- >> when we do the big deal everybody thinks we have to do entitlements and defends on one side and taxes on the other. if you have a school pashtuns do with two legs he usually falls over. if we look at what the canadians did with their cash cow, we have more cash cow in energy than any of them. and we can do spending. we can do taxes, and we can to energy which is our cash cow if we go to and you can make a re
many signs. the austrian accord, big supporters of the environment. think about the amount of paper that was wasted when we drafted the oslo accord. thousands of papers. but today we come and we speak with the palestinian leadership about the oslo accord, well, it is written, so what? for example, [inaudible] a holy site for jews in an in accordance to the oslo accord were supposed to go there whenever we want pray, that we cannot go there. it's not safe for jews, cannot go to date and pray at the tomb of jordan. so it is written in the oslo accords. i don't want to another accord and another ceremony at the white house. i don't believe in it. i want to get to the point where there will be real peace with real partner, and still we'll get to that point we will have to manage the conflict. i want to sum up and tell you that the book is very straight. i didn't hide, and some of my colleagues in the parliament told me, you're making a mistake because if you buy something out in the book and you are young relatively, what will happen in two years? people will go back and tell you, your
about monetary policy and current environment and focus primarily the role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaim, the thoughts are about to give you are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there is a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within, among economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases, lsaps and other unconventional policy tools. this healthy given unenviable circumstances we find ourselves. let me be clear where i stand. i support the committees decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgage-backed securities, mbs, at a rate of $40 billion a month in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities. and to plant a con to continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the labor market outlook. given where we are and given what we know i firmly believe this was the right decision. in my comments today, i'm only going to briefly review the kise for taking that action as tha
atmosphere in a participatory environment and we do not like anyone losing their lives or being killed for any reason anywhere in the world. >> there are protesters all over the middle east threatening american embassies to kill them, to behead them, do you think it should stop? >> you see, i cannot determine what people or nations should do. but i do think that extremism gives birth to following in subsequent extremism. perhaps if the politicians take a better position in the west, vis-a-vis offensive words or pictures toward what is we hold -- what we hold holy, i think conditions will improp prove. but most nations do not pursue tensions and conflict. >> what happens your view, your opinion of the arab spring last year and what is your opinion of what is happening now in the countries where there were uprisings and we saw the end of gadhafi and mubarak and so on? >> i do believe that all of the world needs reform. le reform must take place everywhere. every where. even in the very same place that you and i are sitting because still, humans have not -- have not reached a degree of co
meeting of the mines? >> was driving recruiting in yemen is an economic and social environment that is breaking down. you have the breakdown of traditional tribal and religious institutions. you have massive instability of the a government. you have an ecological crisis. a majority of yemenis are living on less than $60 a month. if you are 30 years old with a wife and three children and maybe our living on $60 a day and someone comes to your community that's cut off from the rest of the world and says if i can pay you $400 but you have to believe in jihad and carry this rifle, that's pra pretty good deal. whether those people get targeted as a result, that is an unfortunate reality. the trip is right now in yemen we don't have a good granular view of what groups, where tribal structures, what regions of the places where al qaeda has a lot of reach and influence. we have a general view from 12,000 feet above. you cannot fight this kind of war by remote control. you have to have the on the ground you. that does not mean we should send lots of troops or have the kind of interventi
. >> and the university is looking foremost to whether or not it has an environment in which african americans or hispanic students don't feel like spokespersons for their races. >> reporter: abigail fisher's lawyer, bert rein, calls college diversity important but not if it discriminates. >> the absence of equal protection was a sin in this country for a long, long time, and we're simply trying to say those rights belong to everybody. >> reporter: several of the justices seem conflicted about that 2003 decision that allows the use of race to achieve college diversity. the author of that decision, sandra day o'connor, was watching these arguments in the courtroom. scott, either way, the future of affirmative action at hundreds of colleges and universities is now in play and riding on this decision. >> pelley: wyatt, as you mentioned, enrollment at the university of texas is nearly 50% white, about 18.5% hispanic, 15% asian and 4.5% black. anna werner found that on the campus, opinions are divided. >> and this is the famous photo. >> reporter: heman sweatt's great uncle went on to become the first african
: coming up on "fox and friends" from water and environment friendly plants what if we told you it was a myth. our next guest said he can prove it? >> brian: romney cutting funding to big bird. but what if it took millions to create jobs and only created two, barely two? ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] feeling like a shadow of your former self? c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of the shadows. hi! how are you? [ male announcer ] learn more at [ laughs ] hey! [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection, and eliminating harmful chemical. additional funding provide by the colecom foundation, the wallace genetic foundation, and by the charles a.frua foundation. this week on "to th to the con y p. >> first, mitt romney's surge with women voters. then tragedy mars the first u.n. international day of the girl child. behind the headlines, wage theft, a little known problem that costs mainly women workers millions of dollars. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, pushing for women. will a more moderate mitt appeal to women voters? that is what the gop presidential hopeful is counting on as he moves more towards the middle on women's rights. romney generated buzz this week over remarks he made about abortion, saying access to abortion is not on his legislative agenda. regardless, he added he would defund planned parenthood and prevent use of federal funds for abortions. he continues to call himself a "pro-life candidate." mea
natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> "outfront," mitt romney is trying to make off with the middle class. romney made another big play for that all important voting block. a >> people in the middle class have been squeezed, buried as the vice president said. >> last night on fox news, romney made an unexpected plea to the same voters, apologizing for the leaked comment about 47% of americans. >> in this case, i said something that's completely wrong and i absolutely believe however that my life has shown that i care about 100%. >> if you listen to how many times he's said middle class over the last few days, it looks like a frontal assault. joining us now -- serving a
that men can understand and that they are comfortable in an environment a trust. -- they trust. i was hoping you guys might oblige me by raising your hands with a response to the first question. my first question is how many of you received daily e-mails encouraging you to go online to buy by agra, silas, and the judge? -- levitra. so virtually everyone. when you think about it, how many of these kinds of e-mails and solicitations encourage you to go find some online solution? i did a quick search for my e- mail. i had 66 e-mails over a monthly span encouraging me, as a man, to go on-line and purchase some sort of solution prescription or therapy that would help to perform better or compete better or live a healthier lifestyle. the message is getting out there. what is the message and where is it leading men, all women, and families? is it a credible sites? is it a credible resource? my question is how many of them are authentic and safe medications for men and women and their families. what we have seen its 40,000 websites are peddling a legend prescription drugs. studies show 95
, in this limited fiscal environment, when we're working together with other countries and we're doing bigger and better things, we have to, you know, retire the older technologies and embrace the new ones and we're going there. >> reporter: any one of you have one favorite shuttle memory? favorite shuttle story? memory? that you actually tell publicly? [ laughter ] i knew that was going to to get them. >> well, we both grew two inches taller. didn't quite make it to six foot. i was 5'11" for two weeks but then i came back down to 5'9". >> reporter: they're going to be on the parade route walking with the shuttle the rest of this way or a good portion of the way over to the california science center. what a treat it's been to talk to the three of them this morning. >> no kidding. i feel like you've cover sod many of these shuttle missions that we need to get you one of those blue jump suits as well one of these days. >> reporter: one of these days -- yeah, she says i should have a blue jump suit. you got that right. thanks, randi. >> thank you. and please thank them as well. that was good to
? so you come into this environment. many people came in without a job. they're just volunteers and they want to get a job. some people, so they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility, right, and they probably traditional in their job. you have department heads who are racing against each other to maybe get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others than you might expect. you have this thing going on where it is a very chaotic time and you really need to get control of this because in this environment where there are no sort of norms, it is like building a village from scratch where everybody comes to a place with no rules, no norms, no structures, right? it's like the wild west and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way, right? sometimes even good people lose control of their inner jerks. that is a problem early in the campaign, right? we all have them, come on. so you throw an elbow at
. not in an environment where posts should to normalize operations. in a rare interview, former c.i.a. director told fox the dots were there and they were connected, but there was a failure to act. >> when somebody tells me a couple of hundred times a year that i don't have a safe situation in my consulate or my embassy, i've got to do better than saying sorry, we can't help you. >> along with nordstrom, the state department manager who signed off on a waiver which meant the consulate was exempt from specific physical security standards is also testifying wednesday. >> shep: we're hearing more about surveillance video from that compound. >> fox is told that there is a security camera video, but it is, quote, limited and it comes from the consulate after republican senator bob corker, who was in libya, confirmed details of video to the "washington post." the attorney general suggested caution. >> people in congress be a little mindful of the fact there is an ongoing investigation and not reveal anything that might compromise our law enforcement investigation. >> new details confirmed by fox showed the at
environment. >> the capstone concept forward says the world is trending towards greater stability, yet it says the world is potentially more dangerous than ever. how will the stability overcome the threat? >> well, you know, when people ask me about afghanistan, the first thing i normally tell them is it's possible for violence and progress to coexist in places like afghanistan. i'd say the same thing about the paradox of stability and threat. they coexist. so i've talked about a security paradox which is violence is at an evolutionary low. and it is, except that the capabilities to impart violence are in the hands of people who heretofore wouldn't have had access to them. so you have a paradox of feeling as though the world is -- this is kind of the tom friedman the world is flat and connected and, therefore, is less likely to fight each other. maybe. but there's also the other school of thought that says it's in the unconnected parts of our globe where violence will be both more prevalent, but also more violent because the instruments of violence are more available now than they've ever been
or midpart of the novel to generationly maybe a more of a focus on the urban environment in the latest stages of the novel. but in so doing he demonstrates a little bit less familiarity with that slice of contemporary chinese life and i think these younger writers are probably more in their -- you might say native habitat when they're writing about these. >> brown: xiao qiang, a brief word on that? how this fits into contemporary writing? >> i think it's very interesting to see how the chinese state media lauded about his receiving this award. in contrast with the former two chinese, as you mentioned, that one is gao xingjian, in exile, the government doesn't approve his politics and the other is liu jiabao. mo yan is his pen name. and his pen name means "don't speak q. sots there's a popular internet joke saying "who is the first chinese winner of a nobel prize? don't speak. who's the second chinese nobel piece prize winner? don't speak. who's the third one? don't speak. this one is mo yan. but two other people are being banned and the chinese official media and chinese internet. >> pelley:
for voluntary action have fallen short. what secretary panetta said in a pre-9/11 environment we had warning to do something. he's pointing to cyberspace right now in that same way. remember, larry, i was there, and i saw those warnings and the cyberspace were in the same space. nbc news terrorism analyst, thank for helping us out. ? you bet. up, in, mitt romney won last week's debate big time. he became a game changer. what's the case he made to reelect barack obama? no one seems to know that including obama himself. that's next on "the kudlow report." ♪ [ male announcer ] the first only the beginning. ♪ ♪ introducing a stunning work of technology. ♪ introducing the entirely new lexus es. and the first ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. >> there was also one person on the stage when actually asked what he'd do to get the economy going again had an answer. he laid out our five-point plan to get this economy going and the other candidate, of course, just attacked. but the american people are looking for answer, not attacks. >> welcome back to "the kudlow repo
go up to 120,000 feet which is a hostile environment. no matter how much you prepare yourself, you never know how it turns out until you do it for real. >>> just 24 days, 24 days until election day, and your right to vote may be at stake. democrats say republican-controlled state legislatures are on a mission to toughen election laws with the goal of suppressing the democratic vote. in florida, the legislature which is controlled by the gop decided to eliminate the sunday before election day as an early voting day. it's a day known as souls to the po polls when african-americans typically leave church to vote. here's joe johns with a preview of his documentary. joe? >> you want your country back? i want mine back. don't have an election if they don't come. >> reporter: for dennis, the gop primary marks the maiden voyage of the election law he crafted. >> election's all about turnout. so for the primary on tuesday, we're working right now to get around saturday morning. this is the grass roots, precinct walking. we are going right on the street. do you know what the number is? i'll
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)